Treatment Programs Specific to Alcohol Abuse

Alcoholism and alcohol use disorder is often described as a downward spiral. The alcoholism leaves a person miserable, who then seeks more alcohol to feel better, only getting worse instead. The vicious circle destroys health, careers, relationships, friendships and ultimately family bonds. No surprise, many patients literally feel like they can’t see a light at the end of the tunnel anymore. Fortunately, even the worst of alcohol addictions can be helped. A number of treatment approaches are available, and patients can get back to a healthy, normal life again.

Factors Contributing to Addiction

Many times, alcoholism and alcohol abuse don’t occur on their own. Multiple factors and elements can put a person in a vulnerable position to develop a drinking addiction. These include medical conditions, psychological factors, family issues, personal history, career pressures, stress, social issues and more. As a result, an effective alcohol addiction treatment program needs to approach patient treatment as a multi-factored approach versus just trying to treat the physical addiction alone.

The Difference in Professional Treatment

A professional approach to treatment will involve a well-trained medical specialist team that works best out of a rehabilitation program and facility. Even if the treatment will be outpatient, medical specialists are essential to identify the nature, scope, and extent of addiction and how to customize the treatment for the specific needs of the individual. And, when one commits to an inpatient program, the support provided by such a team is 24/7, day and night, through the detox phase and smoothly into the recovery and sustaining phase.

Real Recovery is Rooted in the Mind

However, even with the best help, people have to remember that recovery from alcoholism and alcohol abuse is very much a process, not a simple treatment reaction such as taking a pill for pain relief. Under half of the number of folks who try to achieve sobriety and recovery tend to relapse within a year of starting. Those who do succeed are able to do so because they engaged in ongoing counseling and group therapy for ongoing support.

Like any addiction, ultimately the recovery starts when the person realizes he or she needs to stop the condition and try to heal. This mental switch is essential for any physical recovery to begin as well as to continue. The recognition can happen in a number of ways. It can be self-induced. It can happen through family or friend intervention. Or many times it occurs through social response such as getting in trouble with the law or suffering negative career impacts due to alcoholism. Whichever the case, when the person begins to accept help is needed, the detox and recovery phases can begin.

Getting Treatment and Types

There is no bad time to start trying to get treatment. Ideally, as soon as an addiction is identified, treatment should be sought. However, many times folks have been addicted for a long time before it became a serious problem. And such conditions come with complicated relational problems such as financial problems, family disorder, marriage dissolution, legal problems, career problems and more.  This can make a person feel like treatment needs to wait until the other problem is solved, but in reality, the treatment should come first. And that starts by reaching out to medical experts for help.

As mentioned earlier, there are multiple ways treatment can be applied. These include:

  • Alcoholism Detoxification – Probably the most recognizable treatment, this phase involves the separation of the individual from the physical effects of alcohol so the patient can break from the physical cravings. It involves separation, withdrawals, medical treatment for symptoms, and re-establishment of physical health. Many times patients suffer physical reactions to the detox process, which is why the close monitoring of medical experts is essential for success. Otherwise, patients frequently seek out their addiction for quick relief.
  • Inpatient Rehabilitation – This type of treatment involves a combination of detox, medical treatment and recovery help all in one. The patient is contained in a medical facility with expert medical staff on hand, and he or she goes through a full process that can take weeks or even months before an initial recovery condition is reached. The benefit is that the care provided is 24/7 and doesn’t allow the patient to quickly seek relief through the addiction again. It tends to be the most successful method of physical “drying out” for patients.
  • Alcoholism Counseling – Because the mental condition ultimately drives or loses recovery, alcohol counseling is a long-term followup treatment approach that keeps providing support for individuals to stay away from the physical sources of their addiction. To work out the problems that drove them to alcohol abuse, and to provide peer support. A therapist guides the counseling and group sessions often give patients a peer outlet for emotional and mental release. This, in turn, builds resilience and the confidence to stay away from relapse.

Quest 2 Recovery in Lancaster CA provides a Southern California comprehensive approach to alcohol abuse addiction treatment. It is designed as a holistic treatment that insures both short-term and long-term treatment are applied specific to the individual needs of the patient versus cookie-cutter recipe. When you or a loved one realize it’s time for help, Quest 2 Recovery is ready to help. Contact them today for more information.

How To Reach Out For Help While Struggling With Addiction

Facing Facts

One of the most damaging things about addiction is how it alienates us from those who care about us the most. It’s difficult enough admitting we have a problem for ourselves, let alone those around us. We may go through cycles of guilt and despair, determination and denial, almost ready to reach out but somehow never quite doing it.

The climb to recovery is not a journey to be taken alone. Asking for help is essential to breaking those cycles and genuinely moving a better direction. And yet… it can seem so difficult! How do we reach out, even when we don’t feel like we can?

1. Stop focusing on blame, guilt, regret, etc.

There will be plenty of time to feel whatever you feel once you’re getting help and working through your recovery. Right now, all that self-hate and doubt is just getting in the way. We live in a society still trying to break free of a shame-driven past; not everything we believe about ourselves is based on reality so much as our collective cultural baggage.

You may not be able to turn those thoughts and feelings completely off, but you can make the decision to ignore them for two minutes – long enough to reach out. Who could you call if you weren’t overwhelmed with those feelings for a few moments?

2. Let someone else be the “good guy.”

One of the excuses we make when we should be asking for help is that our partner won’t understand, or our family will be so disappointed, or our friends don’t need to be burdened by us. That mindset doesn’t really give the people around us enough credit. Most people want to help, especially if they know what’s needed. Most people want to be useful and to do right by those around them. Wouldn’t you do it for them?

You’ve probably helped someone move, listened while they talked through a big decision, or fed their dog while they were out of town. If sobriety starts with asking someone to make a few calls or drive you to an appointment, is that really asking so much in return?

3. Try someone professional.

If coming clean with those closest to you seems impossible, try someone outside your immediate circle. Talk to your family doctor, even if that’s not what the appointment was originally scheduled to be about. Tell your chiropractor, or lawyer, or pastor, or dentist. Talk to the nurse or even the receptionist. Maybe your workplace benefits include some sort of helpline or referral service.

I promise you, most people get it. They read the research. Primary care folks, especially, have heard it all. They don’t judge. In fact, they want to help; that’s why they became doctors and nurses.

4. Try someone far away.

This is the age of social media and long-distance communication. It might be easier to start with a friend who no longer lives in the area or a family member you don’t see as often. Even reaching out to a “virtual friend” is better than not reaching out, although it’s harder to predict how involved they’re willing or able to be.

Who could you message right now?

5. Seek help online.

If you do a search for “addiction recovery” or “help getting sober” or any variation thereof, you’ll be inundated with more results than you can possibly use. Some will be promoted links (paid ads) – and that’s OK, as long as they’re legitimate organizations. If your search engine does its job, many of the real results will be close to where you live or work – and that’s even better.

Pick one. Open the link. Click the ‘Chat Now’ button or find the phone number which is most likely in a large font near the top of the page. This is what they do. If they can’t help you directly, they can probably help connect you with someone who can.

6. Put it in writing.

Sometimes an email or handwritten note sets us free when speaking face-to-face just feels impossible. If you start writing and a dozen pages of confessions and fears and hopes and apologies pour out, that’s completely fine. It’s also OK if you grab an index card and barely manage “I can’t stop ___________. I need your help.”

Hit send. Tape it to their mirror or laptop. Drop it in the mail. You don’t need to redo it or edit it; you need to share it.

7. Send them this article.

If you can’t think of any other way to say it, cut N paste the link to this page and tweet it, email it, message it. No need to elaborate. You did it.

If you’re receiving this from someone, they need you. Thanks for stepping up.