A Day in the Life of a First Responder in Addiction Treatment

Addiction is one of the most pressing issues facing the public health system today. Some people are at a greater risk of developing addiction and mental health disorders than others, such as individuals who are exposed to traumatic events. This includes first responders; the first people to show up at the scene of a natural disaster, terrorist attack, or serious crime. 

Most people cannot fathom what first responders see on a daily basis, therefore it’s common for first responders to not know where to turn for help. As a result, they end up coping in unhealthy ways. This is one of the biggest reasons why first responders end up developing mental health and substance abuse disorders at a higher rate than the average population. For this reason, there are specific addiction treatment centers that focus on the treatment of first responders.

What Does Addiction Treatment Look Like for First Responders?

If someone has been enrolled in addiction treatment for a first responder, the day is going to follow a typical framework. At a residential inpatient facility, the morning will involve a healthy breakfast which can include a mix of meat, grains, and fruit. Then early meetings are going to take place. Meditation, yoga, or other wellness activities are common during this time. After, group meetings are going to take place where first responders can learn from the experiences of others. There will usually be a counselor or therapist leading the group. They help someone learn about the treatment process, addiction, and recovery. 

After lunch, there are usually one on one therapy sessions. These sessions are going to be tailored to meet the needs of the individual. For example, someone will participate in cognitive behavioral therapy, an effective method used in the treatment of addiction. This treatment therapy focuses on identifying people’s individual responses to triggers. This will also help prevent relapses from taking place. 

Others may participate in specialized sessions. These can be tailored to help someone deal with grief or stress management. More group therapy is also offered at this time of the day or family therapy, helping someone rebuild his or her relationships.

During free time, first responders have the option to enroll in alternative types of therapy. Art therapy, music therapy, dance therapy, exercise therapies, and equine therapy, are all great options for first responders.

Dealing with Mental Health Issues

One of the major issues that accompanies addiction in first responders is the development of mental health disorders. Two of the most common mental health disorders that first responders develop are:

PTSD: Post-traumatic stress disorder, also known as PTSD, is one of the most common mental health disorders that develops among first responders. Symptoms include flashbacks, emotional lability, crying fits, trouble sleeping, and anger issues. People suffering from PTSD encounter triggers that transport them back to the scene of the event. PTSD is best addressed by trained professionals who know how to handle these delicate issues.

Depression: Depression is another mental health disorder that develops among first responders. People with depression often have trouble sleeping, feel guilty about past events, experience changes in appetite, and have issues finding enjoyment in activities that previously put a smile on their faces. Depression can be addressed by a well-rounded treatment approach that involves counseling, therapy, and medication. Of course, it’s up to the discretion of trained professionals about what medicine and therapy should be prescribed. 

How To Find Addiction Treatment for First Responders

It’s critical for anyone who is suffering from mental health or addiction disorders to find treatment. There are a number of ways first responders can find treatment. First, it’s always a good idea to talk to friends and family members. They may know people who have sought out treatment in the past. The internet is also a great tool to research different facilities. The best way to see if a treatment center is right for you is by researching and calling the facility to ask questions.

We Can Help You!

At Quest 2 Recovery, we’re a substance abuse and addiction treatment center that provides specialized treatment for first responders. We are located in the beautiful area of Lancaster, CA. We blend proven therapies with an innovative approach. If you would like to learn more about how we can help you, please contact us today. We would be honored to help you with your healthcare needs and we’d like to thank you for your service. 

Veterans & Substance Abuse: A Growing Problem

Substance abuse is one of the biggest problems in the United States and directly affects the healthcare system. Historically, it’s difficult for people to get the help they need and access mental health resources. As time evolves, more resources are becoming available and they are helping destigmatize mental illness and substance abuse. 

One population that is particularly prone to developing mental health and substance abuse are veterans. We should be honoring the people who serve our country and put their lives on the line every day and make treatment accessible

Statistics on Substance Abuse and Addiction Among Veterans

There is a growing concern surrounding substance abuse and addiction as it relates to veterans. Right now there are more than 2 million people serving in the armed forces and more than 23 million veterans in general. Many of these individuals are facing significant challenges as it relates to drug and alcohol abuse. A study produced following a survey that took place between 2004 and 2006 showed between five and 10 percent of veterans might meet the criteria for a substance abuse disorder. For young adults specifically, this rate was as high as one in four. 

The Reasons Why Veterans Are At Risk

Why are veterans at such a high risk of developing substance abuse and addiction disorders? There are a few reasons to note.

Trauma

This is the biggest factor. Veterans are exposed to events on the battlefield that most people can barely fathom. As a result, they need to find ways to cope with what they see. A large number of veterans go on to develop mental health issues such as PTSD. Some people may not be able to cope with counseling and therapy. Others may not want to. Instead, veterans turn to drugs and alcohol to help them cope. This, in turn, leads to addiction.

Abuse

The rate of sexual assault in the army has come to light recently with alarming numbers. Veterans who are abused in the military are at risk of developing other mental health issues including PTSD and depression. In order to cope with the symptoms of these disorders, veterans may look to drugs and alcohol once again. This is a coping mechanism to help them deal with the trauma they have suffered.

Barriers to Treatment

Some veterans may find that there are major barriers to treatment. There is a shortage of access to mental health resources in the United States and veterans may also struggle to obtain prescription medications they need. This can leave veterans looking to drugs and alcohol for assistance once again.

Homelessness

Homelessness is a devastating epidemic amongst United States veterans. The vast majority of veterans who are homeless also have mental health disorders. It can be difficult for a veteran to find and maintain a job while battling mental health disorders. Without a job and health insurance, they will struggle to find health care providers who are willing to see them. This contributes to drug and alcohol abuse even further.

Drug Abuse and Addiction Among Active Members

There is an epidemic of drug and alcohol abuse in the military. Members serving often turn to prescription medications to help them cope with their experiences while on active duty. Some of these members even use prescription medications to self medicate chronic pain and PTSD. Many of these prescription medications end up getting abused because they are extremely addictive.

It is important for everyone, including veterans, to know that resources are available that can help people fight back against addiction. There is no shame in asking for help. With the guidance of trained professionals, everyone can beat addiction.

Rely on Quest 2 Recovery for Addiction Treatment

Anyone who is looking for addiction treatment including veterans should rely on Quest 2 Recovery in Lancaster, California. Our trained professionals will work with you to come up with a plan that suits your needs. We offer treatment plans that also specialize in dual diagnosis which is perfect for veterans battling PTSD and substance abuse. Contact us today to get more information and help. 

Why You Should Never Detox From Drugs By Yourself

When you have a drug or alcohol problem, detoxing yourself is a dangerous choice. The problem with detoxing at home is that the withdrawals you go through need professional medical supervision. Withdrawal symptoms from detox are delusions, seizures, insomnia, vomiting, appetite changes, sleeping problem, anxiety,  and poor concentration.  Often medications or medical treatment is needed to control serious withdrawal symptoms. Drug abuse and alcohol abuse should never be treated at home due to the serious symptoms that occur. Professional medical supervision with nurses, doctors, and trained staff is needed to safely get off drugs and alcohol.

Reasons That Individuals Attempt to Detox Alone

Sometimes friends or family may tell the person that they can overcome the addiction with will power. This makes them believe that if they try hard enough they can stop drinking or taking drugs. This never works because it is like treating a chronic medical condition without a doctor. After detox, most people need psychological counseling to change their behavior and lifestyle. Detox is only one part of the entire process for recovering from addiction. Changing your behavior and thoughts is the next part.  Often the person does not want anyone to know they have a problem with drugs and alcohol.  Guilt and shame are connected to addiction.

Often the fear of being arrested or reported is another reason individual detox at home. They might fear to end up with a criminal record or be known as an addict. They may never mention the problem to their doctor or seek advice or treatment. Other reasons are that the person fears they may lose their job if the employer learns about their addiction. Some may have tried a treatment program and relapsed. So they conclude these programs do not work, and they do not want to go them again. Going back for treatment, a second time does not mean it will fail again.

Another reason someone does not seek treatment is that they may have concerns about the cost of treatment and not having the right insurance to cover it. Treatment centers accept insurance and sometimes financial help is available for those that need it.  A lack of money does not have to be a problem when seeking professional treatment. The danger of detoxing alone from alcohol or drugs is very high. Physical symptoms can lead to a medical emergency. Often physical symptoms last for a few weeks or longer. This can lead to serious illness and death in some cases.

Quest 2 Drug and Alcohol Treatment Program

Quest 2 Recovery in Lancaster CA has a complete addiction treatment program the had detox for drug and alcohol abuse, inpatient care, dual diagnosis, and aftercare. We treat alcohol, prescription drugs, heroin, cocaine, meth, opioid, and other substance abuse. Their detox program helps the patient to deal with the withdrawal symptoms with supervised medical care. Often prescription drugs are prescribed to help the person with withdrawal symptoms. They minimize the side effects caused when they stop using alcohol or drugs. Our program provides medical and psychological treatment for detox. Both are needed for success.

The first stage is to evaluate the patient through blood tests, medical tests, and psychological tests. Once the patient diagnosed and admitted they will receive medical and psychological counseling as they go through the detox program. The length of time it takes to go through detox depends on the severity of the addiction. We offer many support therapies as part of our program. We have group therapy, anger management, cognitive behavioral therapy,  individual counseling, meditation, yoga, art, music, exercise, family therapy, social skills, 12-step programs, and more.

We offer Neurotherapy that targets how the brain processes information. This treatment is used to treat addiction and the symptoms that often accompany it. Trained professionals help patients change their thought processes by a series of specific exercises. It relieves stress, anxiety, and stabilizes mood swings. It is a form of biofeedback that uses electrical sensors and a computer to measure brain waves. Patients learn to control their thoughts through visual and auditory feedback.

After a patient is released, we have aftercare programs to help them make a transition back to regular life. We have group therapy, classes that teach living skills, help with housing and finding a place to live and help with going back to school and finding work. All these programs help to keep the patient from relapsing by providing support in needed areas.

Don’t try to treat drug abuse or alcohol abuse alone, contact Quest 2 Recovery for an evaluation and a program that works for you. We provide addiction treatment and psychological treatment and will find the best program for your addiction. We want to help you overcome addiction and learn to live again. Call us at 1-885-783-7888 or fill out our online form.

How to Find Substance Abuse Treatment as a First Responder

Battling addiction is always tough. It can be even more difficult if you are a first responder and your reputation and livelihood are on the line due to substance abuse. That’s why Quest 2 Recovery in Lancaster, CA, has devoted an entire program for first responders to heal along with peers going through the same issues.

Statistics indicate that first responders, such as firefighters and police officers, often turn to alcohol and drugs to self-medicate from PTSD and stress related to their jobs. According to a recent SAMHSA report, for example, heavy or binge drinking occurred among half male firefighters surveyed in the previous month. Of these, 9% admitted to driving under the influence of alcohol.

Who Are First Responders?

You may imagine that first responders consist of ambulance drivers and ER medical professionals combined with police officers, FEMA workers, and firefighters. However, there are many other careers that involve people to respond to emergency situations. If you or a loved one works as an air marshall, campus security officer, animal control officer, DEA agent, park rangers, Red Cross worker or serve in the military, then this label fits your job title.

First responders arrive first when a crisis occurs. This includes terror attacks, crimes, accidents, and natural disasters. They have the tough job of preventing the loss of life and harm to pets and property as fire rage, rivers flood and buildings crumble around them. Due to the extreme nature of the job, these workers suffer more trauma than most people do during the course of their workday. Therapists and others used to think that these people were resilient and able to leave the stress and strain at the doorstep when they got home. That turns out to be untrue.

Researchers are still struggling to understand how the constant stress of being a first responder impacts substance abuse disorders and alcohol addiction. Mental health disorders, such as depression, anxiety, and PTSD play their own roles and have to be addressed as part of any robust first responder treatment program. At Quest 2 Recovery, we provide a place for first responders to meet and discuss their addiction in a safe space. Participants learn to confront their addiction and pick up valuable coping skills that help them avoid a relapse.

First Responder Group Therapy

Clients who participate in first responder group therapy can open up and help their peers process their experiences. Everyone in the circle understands the stress that comes with knowing someone else’s life may depend on your actions. Some of the people you meet in group therapy sessions may include correctional officers, emergency medical professionals, law enforcement, firefighters and military veterans. Many people who attend this exclusive group therapy session gain confidence in their ability to discuss and face their challenges.

This is a critical component of your recovery, and it’s much easier to share your thoughts and feelings when you are with a group of people who are going through a similar experience. Within a group of peers, there’s no fear of judgment. This has been a barrier for first responders attending group sessions with others recovering from substance abuse. Group sessions are overseen a licensed therapist and conducted in a private setting.

First First Responder Addiction Treatment in Lancaster, CA

At Quest 2 Recovery, our substance abuse recovery program is open to first responders in the Lancaster, CA, area and beyond. Contact us today to take the first step in a life free of drugs and alcohol. We know that you face more stress and trauma than most people face in a lifetime, but there’s hope for a brighter future among a community of your peers. We have a residential detox and residential inpatient treatment options for substance abuse recovery.

Neurotherapy for Chemical Dependency in First Responders

First Responders are some of the most important people for those struggling with addiction. They are often the first point of contact for individuals with chemical dependency problems who are at the hardest points of their illness. The unfortunate truth is that First Responders can also develop these problems themselves.

Neurotherapy is a new technique for helping to treat addiction. It has proven useful for First Responders and makes an effective complement to other treatments.

First Responders and Substance Abuse

First Responders face life-threatening conditions and high-stress work environments. This exposure to stress can lead to higher rates of substance abuse amongst these workers.

Firefighters face dangerous work conditions. They respond to everything from potential threatening medical calls to burning buildings. In addition to those risks, firefighters also face medical side effects from their work such as burns and lung disease. All of this adds up to the sad fact that rates of binge drinking are higher amongst firefighters than the general population.

Paramedics and EMTs also have to navigate saving people’s lives while coping with some of the most demanding work conditions known in America today. Paramedics routinely work shifts longer than 12 hours and are often on-call for nights and doubles. During these working hours, they have to keep their focus sharp in order to help people with all kinds of medical conditions from routine accidents to life-threatening emergencies. The stress, long hours, and dangerous conditions lead to PTSD and anxiety being higher amongst paramedics than the general population. This can also lead to higher rates of substance abuse just to keep up.

Other first responders also face dangerous conditions similar to the two outlined here. No matter what the specific job is, all first responders have a high-stress environment to cope with.

What is Neurotherapy

This therapeutic technique is a non-invasive, medication-free technique that helps identify areas of the brain that might have become damaged or otherwise aren’t functioning at their best. This therapy has been used for ADHD, insomnia, and PTSD. It has also shown very promising results for people struggling with addiction.

Neurotherapy is based on the “brain disease” model of addiction. This medical model is embraced by the National Institute on Drug Abuse. This model correctly suggests that addiction is caused by changes to the brain and not by any moral failing. The idea that addiction is caused by moral weakness or lack of willpower is outdated and not very helpful for people in recovery.

How Neurotherapy can Help Treat Addiction

Neurotherapy uses state of the art brain mapping technology to identify the areas of the brain most damaged by addiction. While it may look like a machine from a science fiction movie, the technology behind this therapy is perfectly safe and totally noninvasive.

Once areas of the brain are identified, positive stimulus is given to those areas when the brain is in a calm state. This helps individuals struggling to recover from drug and alcohol abuse associate calm sensations with positive feedback which helps to break the cycle of addiction.

Neurotherapy is typically used in conjunction with other therapies such as classic 12 Step programs or more modern therapies such as SMART. This therapy helps return control back to the individual and helps them slowly repair areas of the brain that have been changed through the course of a substance abuse problem.

Get Help Today

Addiction can feel like it is unbeatable, but with help, you can overcome it. First Responders are on the frontlines helping people with addiction start their recoveries and help is available for them as well.

Are You Ready to Quit Heroin? Here’s How it’s Done

Among the numerous issues facing the modern healthcare system, addiction is among the most serious. There are countless people all over the country who are dealing with addiction to alcohol, drugs, and other dangerous substances. There has been a lot of attention paid to addiction over the past few years. The evaporation of the stigma surrounding addiction and the new diagnostic and treatment options have already helped numerous people all over the world. One of the often-overlooked addictive substances is heroin. This is a dangerous drug that can lead to serious side effects that leave individuals and families everywhere looking for answers. Fortunately, those who are looking for a way to quit heroin have a few steps they can take to get themselves, and their families, moving in the right direction.

An Overview of Heroin

When it comes to this drug, there are a handful of things that everyone should keep in mind. First, heroin is a potent opiate that works on the brain to trigger a powerful reward effect. When heroin is ingested, it causes the brain to release a set of chemicals that make people feel good. Some of the examples of these substances include dopamine and endorphins. Furthermore, this reward system is actually so powerful that about 25 percent of all people who try heroin for the first time are addicted instantly.

This reward system is important because these chemicals are actually necessary for survival. For example, they help people cope with pain, hunger, and other difficult situations. Unfortunately, the brain actually responds to heroin in a similar way. Eventually, people get to the point that they actually cannot function without the drug. Furthermore, when people do try to stop, they start to develop withdrawal symptoms. This makes the process of quitting even more difficult.

Signs that an Addiction has Formed

If someone has become addicted to heroin, there are going to be a few common symptoms that people might demonstrate. First, one of the major signs is that the person continues to use heroin even though the drug has caused major problems in his or her life. It might impact their job, school performance, and relationships with family members and friends.

Next, people who are addicted to heroin often try to quit but fail multiple times. This can bring a lot of frustration to the individual, causing him or her to feel down and hopeless.

In addition, those who are addicted to heroin will start to have cravings. When they have gone without heroin for a long time, their body will start to trigger the feeling of wanting, hunger, or demand for the addictive drug.

Finally, people who are addicted to heroin will often develop a tolerance to heroin. This means that they will require more of the same drug to achieve the same effect. When they go without the drug for a while, they may also start to develop withdrawal symptoms. These can take the form of chills, shakes, sweats, and more. People who are developing these symptoms when it comes to heroin need to know that professional help is available.

Getting Help for an Addiction to Heroin

Because of the reward system that heroin triggers, this addiction can be one of the most difficult to treat; however, heroin addiction treatment is available and people can quit with the right support. It is important for people to rely on the support of their loved ones, as this will play an important role in helping someone cope with the addiction emotionally. Then, it is a good idea to trust the professionals when it comes to addiction treatment. Heroin is challenging to break and there are professionals who have helped people break their heroin addiction in the past. There are outpatient options, partial hospitalization programs, and inpatient treatment options that can help people flush heroin, and its side effects, out of the system, helping people feel as good as new. Even though there are going to be significant challenges when it comes to this process, breaking heroin’s hold is possible.

Breaking an Addiction to Heroin

These are a few steps that people can take to try to break their addiction to heroin. This is a dangerous drug that can lead to dangerous side effects. The symptoms of withdrawal, along with those that accompany an overdose, can be life-threatening. Therefore, anyone who is looking to break their addiction to help should rely on the experience of trained professionals. Breaking an addiction to alcohol and drugs, such as heroin, is a difficult task and those who are suffering from addiction need to know that they do not have to face this problem alone. The support of family members, friends, and trained professionals can help someone get on the road to recovery.

If you or a loved one are struggling with heroin addiction, contact us today. At Quest 2 Recovery, our goal is to help you free yourself from the chains of addiction. Our friendly and professional staff is waiting on your call.

PTSD And Addiction In First Responders

First responders have a grueling job. They see things that most people may not ever even have nightmares about and many first responders do not have access to the therapy and the help that they need to be able to effectively deal with these horrible circumstances and the stresses they deal with each day.

First Responders and PTSD

PTSD, or post-traumatic stress disorder, is far more common in first responders than you might imagine. These brave men and women go headfirst into circumstances that most people would run from. They see people hurt, they see people dying, they see people that have lost their fight and they deal with the carnage that is left behind. As a result, PTSD is terribly common among first responders and is more likely to develop the longer a first responder is on the job and the more that they deal with.

On top of all the things they see, they also have a job that is high in stress which can have adverse effects on the overall health and mental state of our first responders. For some, drugs and alcohol are a welcome reprieve from the pain, suffering, and mental anguish that they deal with on a daily basis. To add insult to injury, many first responders also deal with depression and have no real means of being treated and of seeking therapy or other means of help for these disorders.

Treatment Options

The first step to treating addiction in anyone is to determine what the addiction is and to take the time to address it on a person by person basis. What might work for one person may not work for a first responder and vice versa making an individualistic approach important. Once you have established that there is a problem with substance abuse and that treatment is needed, it is important to find an approach that is right for each addict.

Depending on what type of first responder you are working with, you may need to talk to supervisors and other higher officials to determine just what type of treatment is needed so that the first responder can return to work should the want to. With PTSD, it is going to be necessary not only to treat the addiction to any substances that might be being used, but also to treat the PTSD, depression or any other mental diseases that the individual might be dealing with at the same time.

These first responders may want a private treatment that is not going to put them in the public eye, they may need special care that allows them to continue work when they are not in treatment, and they are going to need special handling. Being a first responder is difficult, being a first responder that is also dealing with drug and alcohol addiction is even harder.

Unique Approach

A treatment facility like Quest 2 Recovery offers unique treatment options that are tailored to the individual rather than to the masses. They create treatment plans that are both inpatient residential and those programs that allow the patients to go about their daily lives while still getting the treatment that they need.

They use therapy, detox, group support, exercise and more all in an effort to create a program that is going to work for each particular patient to provide the most success and the best rates of healing. It is the goal of recovery to allow patients to have the treatment that is going to work best for them and that is going to promote life long healing and recovery.

PTSD is not something that can be healed in one fail swoop. It is an ongoing battle and if the patient is continually exposed to the conditions and events that encourage and foster the PTSD it will only get worse. There are plenty of first responders that have gone down the path of substance abuse and many that have not been given an adequate chance to recover. Exclusive rehab options that take into account the type of work these people do each day, rehab that takes personality and disposition and more is going to be far more effective than a one size fits all rehab that does not really make a difference.

Specialized care is something that can help first responders to deal with their addiction and to actually get better. Addiction is not something that we have to deal with, if you or someone you love is addicted to alcohol, drugs or other substances and they are also dealing with PTSD, a specialized approach is going to make a big difference. With the right treatment, anyone can deal with addiction and become happy, healthy, and free of the burden of addiction and the pain it causes.

Stress & Addiction: How They Fuel Each Other

In the United States, 8 out of 10 people consider themselves stressed. Whether it be an internal force that causes their stress, like overthinking or fear of missing out, or external factors like family problems or troubles at work, there are a myriad of ways that stress can creep into our lives. According to the American Psychological Association, the top stressors of Americans are money, work, the economy, family responsibilities, relationships, personal health concerns, housing costs, job stability, health of loved ones, and personal safety, in that order.

With that in mind, what coping mechanisms do people utilize in order to manage their stress? Some might exercise more to alleviate their stress. Others might meditate. But for those with addiction, stress could become a trigger for their vice.

What is Stress?

Stress is the feeling of pressure mentally and how the body responds to it. Stress can be due to strenuous circumstances that make life more difficult, but it could also be the body’s inability to cope with its surroundings.

What is Addiction?

Addiction is the brain choosing a substance or behavior for the feeling that it provides despite the often negative consequences of use. The first addictions that come to mind are typically drugs or alcohol, but there are many other types of addiction. Addiction is not about the use of a bad substance, but the mind’s dependence of use of any substance. Here are some examples of substances that people can become addicted to:

  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Cannabis
  • Inhalants
  • Opioid
  • Sedatives
  • Stimulants
  • Tobacco and Nicotine

Here are some behaviors that people can become addicted to:

  • Binge-eating
  • Shoplifting
  • Sex
  • Gaming
  • Gambling
  • Shopping
  • Smartphone Use

While it is possible to see that the excessive use of a substance or action is bad for your health or wallet, it is important to understand that treating the addiction is not about what you are addicted to but the feeling that you are addicted to.

Are Stress and Addiction Related?

Yes. In the cases that stress can affect addiction, stress is referred to as environmental factors. Think about how many people say they need a drink after a bad day at work. There are people who need to smoke a cigarette after an argument with a coworker or family member. There are others who insist that a day at the casino or some consumer therapy will help alleviate any stressful situation that they may have. While not all people who exercise this use of substance or behavior in response to stress are addicted to the substance or behavior, these environmental factors can be a trigger to those with addiction to use their vice as a way of coping with their stress.

Addiction Treatment

There are many ways of treating addiction. People who require addiction treatment can consider each of the following options as a way of treating their addiction:

  • Detoxification
  • Medication-Assisted Therapy
  • Therapy (Group, Cognitive, Recreational or Family)
  • Stress Tolerance
  • Medication and Withdrawal Management

There are numerous other addiction treatment plans available. It is important to understand that managing the triggers of addiction, such as stress and stressful environmental factors, is essential in creating a successful addiction treatment plan. In addition to residential treatment plans, there are after-rehabilitation support groups that can share and compare addiction treatment journeys to ensure a sense of accountability and encouragement among those with stress and addiction.

At Quest 2 Recovery, the addiction recovery program starts with detoxification and ends with aftercare planning, to ensure that recovery continues to be a part of your life even as you leave the rehabilitation center. While stress might trigger your addiction, Quest 2 Recovery can give you the tools to find healthier ways of coping with your stress.  Contact us today if you or a loved one are struggling with addiction.

5 Signs It’s Time To Intervene

Addiction will not only affect the life of an addict, but also those around them. Alcohol and drug addiction can break families, leaving lives in wrecks.

You might be having someone battling drug or alcohol addiction, and you don’t know how to help. In most cases, talking to the victim might not provide excellent results. That is because the majority of people suffering from addiction are still in denial about their addiction state. In that case, doing an intervention for a person strolling with drug or alcohol abuse is the best solution. It will help the victim to transition into the treatment procedure safely and swiftly. Before you stage the intervention, make sure you invite a doctor to help you through the process. Also, have non-attacking letters to your loved ones, and have a treatment plan in case the victim refuses to get help.

Importance of intervention

  • Assists the victim to realize that alcohol and drugs have become a life-threatening threat
  • Identifies addition or abuse as a medical disorder
  • Offers an alternative for instant treatment
  • Determines what will be affected in a relationship, at work, at home if the victim refuses to be helped

Timing

Addiction can be a life-threatening event to the individual battling with alcohol or drug dependence and the family as well. But, what is the perfect time to perform an intervention to increase the chances of getting the required results?

The ideal time to stage an intervention is determined by:

  • The capability of the participants to come together for the intervention
  • When the victim is sober and available
  • When it’s evident that the victim’s life is in danger
  • Let’s look at the signs; it’s time for an intervention.
  • The victim’s destructive behavior subjects his or her family at risk

People struggling with addiction encounter challenges related to taking care of their families. In most cases, they engage in vicious habits, like passing out and overdosing. They might also endanger other family members by driving under the influence or using drugs in the presence of kids.

Once you start to see an increased incidence of failure to make informed decisions about their health or your own, it’s the right time for an intervention. In most cases, drug or alcohol abuse will escalate before getting better.

Failure to tell the truth

Where they spend their free time is a secret to you, and you don’t know the substance they are using. Once you realize that your loved one is trying to dodge the truth, ensure you understand why. Addiction tends to create a physical and chemical dependency that makes it hard to make the right decisions. However, your loved one realizes they are doing something wrong by using the substance. Drug or alcohol abuse triggers lies that build upon each other and worsens over time.

The use of substance becomes uncontrollable

The consumption of drugs or alcohol will increase as the abuse of these substances worsens. You might various signs of a controlled level of consumption like:

  • Making stopover to get a drink on when going home from work and coming home late
  • Using the drugs in the morning
  • The urge to look for more drugs since what they have is not enough

Typically, those with addiction find themselves creating tolerance faster. That means they want drugs with more intense effects to get a similar feeling.

They act or look sick

Those with addiction problems strive to make it a secret. While some might think they are successful, they will feel horrible most of the time and look sick. You might realize they don’t wear clean or wrinkle-free clothes anymore. They will also look pale and appear to have lost a lot of weight.

Remember that you might notice mental health changes like being east to anger or avoiding other family members.  That withdrawn personality is a symptom of addiction, indicating that they need help.

The financial hardship is worsening

Maintaining a substance abuse condition is a costly affair. You might be struggling to balance your cost and finding it hard to make ends meet. The victim might go to work, and your revenue might be the same, but his or her bank account is always dry. You might also realize that your loved one is finding it hard to maintain a job. This will result in financial hardships like having their assets repossessed. Your loved one might also be lending money frequently and promising to pay back, but defaulting later on.

Final word

Before you decide to stage an intervention meeting, make sure you have a plan. You need to understand what issues you need to address and rehearse saying them without any anger. Being accusatory and raising your voice towards the addiction treatment victim will push them away. You can invite an interventionist in the event the situation worsens. Make sure there is a treatment plan such that the victim will be admitted right after the intervention.

 

Treatment Programs Specific to Alcohol Abuse

Alcoholism and alcohol use disorder is often described as a downward spiral. The alcoholism leaves a person miserable, who then seeks more alcohol to feel better, only getting worse instead. The vicious circle destroys health, careers, relationships, friendships and ultimately family bonds. No surprise, many clients literally feel like they can’t see a light at the end of the tunnel anymore. Fortunately, even the worst of alcohol addictions can be helped. A number of treatment approaches are available, and clients can get back to a healthy, normal life again.

Factors Contributing to Addiction

Many times, alcoholism and alcohol abuse don’t occur on their own. Multiple factors and elements can put a person in a vulnerable position to develop a drinking addiction. These include medical conditions, psychological factors, family issues, personal history, career pressures, stress, social issues and more. As a result, an effective alcohol addiction treatment program needs to approach a client’s treatment as a multi-factored approach versus just trying to treat the physical addiction alone.

The Difference in Professional Treatment

A professional approach to treatment will involve a well-trained medical specialist team that works best out of a rehabilitation program and facility. Even if the treatment will be outpatient, medical specialists are essential to identify the nature, scope, and extent of addiction and how to customize the treatment for the specific needs of the individual. And, when one commits to an inpatient program, the support provided by such a team is 24/7, day and night, through the detox phase and smoothly into the recovery and sustaining phase.

Real Recovery is Rooted in the Mind

However, even with the best help, people have to remember that recovery from alcoholism and alcohol abuse is very much a process, not a simple treatment reaction such as taking a pill for pain relief. Under half of the number of folks who try to achieve sobriety and recovery tend to relapse within a year of starting. Those who do succeed are able to do so because they engaged in ongoing counseling and group therapy for ongoing support.

Like any addiction, ultimately the recovery starts when the person realizes he or she needs to stop the condition and try to heal. This mental switch is essential for any physical recovery to begin as well as to continue. The recognition can happen in a number of ways. It can be self-induced. It can happen through family or friend intervention. Or many times it occurs through social response such as getting in trouble with the law or suffering negative career impacts due to alcoholism. Whichever the case, when the person begins to accept help is needed, the detox and recovery phases can begin.

Getting Treatment and Types

There is no bad time to start trying to get treatment. Ideally, as soon as an addiction is identified, treatment should be sought. However, many times folks have been addicted for a long time before it became a serious problem. And such conditions come with complicated relational problems such as financial problems, family disorder, marriage dissolution, legal problems, career problems and more.  This can make a person feel like treatment needs to wait until the other problem is solved, but in reality, the treatment should come first. And that starts by reaching out to medical experts for help.

As mentioned earlier, there are multiple ways treatment can be applied. These include:

  • Alcoholism Detoxification – Probably the most recognizable treatment, this phase involves the separation of the individual from the physical effects of alcohol so the client can break from the physical cravings. It involves separation, withdrawals, medical treatment for symptoms, and re-establishment of physical health. Many times clients suffer physical reactions to the detox process, which is why the close monitoring of medical experts is essential for success. Otherwise, clients frequently seek out their addiction for quick relief.
  • Inpatient Rehabilitation – This type of treatment involves a combination of detox, medical treatment and recovery help all in one. The client is contained in a medical facility with expert medical staff on hand, and he or she goes through a full process that can take weeks or even months before an initial recovery condition is reached. The benefit is that the care provided is 24/7 and doesn’t allow the client to quickly seek relief through the addiction again. It tends to be the most successful method of physical “drying out” for clients.
  • Alcoholism Counseling – Because the mental condition ultimately drives or loses recovery, alcohol counseling is a long-term followup treatment approach that keeps providing support for individuals to stay away from the physical sources of their addiction. To work out the problems that drove them to alcohol abuse, and to provide peer support. A therapist guides the counseling and group sessions often give clients a peer outlet for emotional and mental release. This, in turn, builds resilience and the confidence to stay away from relapse.

Quest 2 Recovery in Lancaster CA provides a Southern California comprehensive approach to alcohol abuse addiction treatment. It is designed as a holistic treatment that insures both short-term and long-term treatment are applied specifically to the individual needs of the client versus a cookie-cutter recipe. When you or a loved one realize it’s time for help, Quest 2 Recovery is ready to help. Contact us today for more information.