Neurotherapy & Addiction: All You Need To Know

Addiction and substance abuse aren’t a matter of self-control, they are a physiological disorder that runs much deeper. Attempting to become sober and live a life of recovery can be intimidating and may seem impossible to someone battling an addiction, but it’s certainly possible to live a fulfilling, drug and alcohol-free life. Treatment options such as detoxification, inpatient, and outpatient programs, are widely available for someone looking to get sober. 

As technology advances, there are investments in new diagnostic and treatment options for addicts. One popular tool used in treatment is called biofeedback, which is the process of collecting information about the human body and applying it in various techniques. One sub-form of biofeedback is Neurotherapy.

What is Neurotherapy?

Neurotherapy, also known as neurofeedback, is one of the main components of biofeedback. This type of therapy collects information on the signals that are passed between parts of the brain. This tool can be used to measure the health of someone’s brain. The brain plays a major role in addiction because when someone is addicted to a substance, the fundamental chemistry of the brain changes. An addicted brain believes it requires the substance to stay alive. Neurotherapy can help retrain the brain to live without the substance, ultimately leading to someone overcoming addiction. The biggest takeaway from Neurotherapy is that it’s a long term solution to a chronic disease. 

How Does it Work?

Neurotherapy is a multi-step process that includes equipment, software, and feedback. The clinician, during the sessions, uses electronic sensors to monitor the waves of the brain. Over time, these sensors are going to collect information on what is happening in the rest of the brain. These signals are going to produce waves on a sheet of paper that varies in height and frequency. Using a process that is called quantitative EEG, also shortened to EEG, the doctor will be able to spot areas of dysregulation throughout the brain. This information is then used to teach the addict how to change their own physiological activity, by changing their thoughts and emotions. 

How Does it Help in Treating Addiction?

Neurotherapy helps in treating addiction because it will help the addict accept change. One of the biggest hurdles in recovery is for an addict’s brain to accept the change that they’ll no longer rely on the substance they were addicted to. The waves that are recorded during Neurotherapy can also be applied to come up with an effective treatment strategy for those who suffer from addiction. An EEG from someone who suffers from addiction can be compared to the EEG of someone who doesn’t suffer from addiction. Then, differences between the two patterns can be spotted. 

There are numerous addiction treatment strategies that can be applied based on information from an EEG in a Neurotherapy session. For example, the brain waves of someone who suffers from an addiction to alcohol might be different from someone who suffers from an addiction to cocaine. Depending on the appearance of these waves, some people might respond better to certain treatments than others. Therefore, Neurotherapy can play an important role in someone’s recovery process, guiding professionals in coming up with a treatment plan that has been tailored to meet the needs of the individual.

Let Us Help You!

At Quest 2 Recovery, we are a dual diagnosis, substance abuse program that offers detoxification and residential inpatient levels of care. Our goal is to help people in the Los Angeles and Southern California area during the first few days of the treatment process. Our professionals have undergone extensive training to help individuals who suffer from a variety of forms of addiction including drugs, alcohol, and more. We will help you through the most challenging days of the journey toward sobriety. If you would like to learn more about how we can help you recover from addiction, please contact us today! We would be honored to assist you.